Virginia Maritime News

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Two men are safe after their jet skis broke down while on a trip out to the Monitor Merrimack Bridge. The men, from Suffolk and Chesapeake, say their jet skis experienced mechanical failure. They were forced to swim the channel for hours with their jet skis in tow. When the men failed to turn up as originally scheduled, their families called authorities to help search for the pair.

The jet skiers ultimately ended up at the former site of Bennett Creek Restaurant. They tied up their jet skis and walked to a nearby grocery store, where they were able to call home and report that they were safe. The call came around 2:30 in the morning — about eight hours after the men set out on their jet skis.

Neither man was injured in this incident. That this story has a happy ending is something of a miracle. Both men were wearing jet skis when they became stranded on the water, which surely helped them to not grow exhausted from swimming.

This incident highlights the importance of those life jackets. Had these men gone jet skiing without them on, this news report might have ended much differently. When you and your family take to the open water this summer, make sure everyone has their life jacket on and properly fitting.

Like any watercraft, jet skis can break down when you least expect them to. It’s important they receive regular maintenance, especially before they go out on the water for the summer!

Maritime Accident Lawyer Richard Serpe – GET HELP

Maritime environments are no different. If you’ve been injured an experienced maritime and Jones Act attorney can help you recover the damages related to your injury. Richard Serpe gained a Masters Degree in maritime law from Tulane University School of Law. He has also been awarded the rank of Proctor (the highest rank available) from the Maritime Law Association of the United States.

FREE MARITIME ACCIDENT CONSULTATION 877-544-5323

A woman is recovering in the hospital following a boat crash in Spotsylvania, Virginia. She and a companion were boating on Lake Anna around 9 PM the night of May 28. The boat struck the shore after propelling 20 feet. The owner and operator of the boat was not injured in the crash, but the female passenger was hospitalized.

The owner was charged with reckless operation of a watercraft. Initial investigations reveal speed was a factor in the accident.

Too often, we see boats as oversized toys rather than the vehicle they actually are. Sure, there’s tons of fun to be had aboard a speed boat, but there’s no denying the risks involved, too. Too many people forget that their boat is as dangerous — if not more so — than their car. Just like drivers of cars, boaters must follow safety rules and regulations on top of laws regarding speed. Even late at night when the lake is empty, these laws must be adhered to.

Boating laws exist not only to protect the general public, but to protect ourselves as well. When boaters make risky moves, they can end in tragedy.

Reduce the risks of an accident the next time you go boating. Always follow boating laws and avoid excessive speed. Never drink and operate a boat, and always wear your life vest, even if you think you don’t need it! Nothing spoils a nice night out on the water like a trip to the hospital or an arrest. Stay safe and keep everyone happy!

Maritime Accident Lawyer Richard Serpe – GET HELP

Maritime environments are no different. If you’ve been injured an experienced maritime and Jones Act attorney can help you recover the damages related to your injury. Richard Serpe gained a Masters Degree in maritime law from Tulane University School of Law. He has also been awarded the rank of Proctor (the highest rank available) from the Maritime Law Association of the United States.

FREE MARITIME ACCIDENT CONSULTATION 877-544-5323

Three people are recovering from injuries sustained in an boat explosion last week in North Carolina. WTKR reports that the Ocean Isle Beach accident occurred Friday, June 2nd on a dock along the coast. The explosion occurred when two boaters accidentally put 28 gallons of gas into a fishing rod holder.

A fellow boater noticed the sheen of gas on the water and informed the men of their mistake. He warned them not to start up their engine in case of an explosion, and urged them to call for a tow instead. When the boaters disconnected their battery cables, a spark ignited and caught the gasoline on fire. The boat quickly exploded. All three of the men on board were injured, and two had to be airlifted to a local burn unit for treatment.

This accident highlights the risk for real danger in even the most relaxed of days on a boat. Shockingly, the explosion could have caused even more damage, as the fire inched incredibly close to nearby gas pumps. Thankfully, someone was able to turn the pumps off in time to prevent more explosions. We applaud the quick thinking and action of the people on staff.

Accidents can happen to even the most experienced boater. On many boats, the fishing rod holder is right next to the gas tank. It’s easy to get distracted, stick the gas nozzle in the holder and pour fuel into the completely wrong place. Let this incident serve as a reminder to take care when fueling up this summer!

Virginia Maritime Accident Lawyer

The law governing matters related to the navigable waters of the world has developed for centuries and when you need legal help because of accidents, injuries, and wrongful death related to maritime activities, you need a lawyer who understands these laws.

Richard Serpe gained a Masters Degree in maritime law from Tulane University School after graduating law school. He has also been awarded the rank of Proctor (the highest rank available) from the Maritime Law Association of the United States. Mr. Serpe has helped victims of serious injuries, and families affected by a wrongful death, for over 29 years. If you’d like to speak with Richard Serpe about your situation, contact us today 877-544-5323.

We’re finishing out Safe Boating Week today with a spotlight on the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. Though we might traditionally associate this health hazard with the colder months – most carbon monoxide poisonings come from furnaces, stoves and other heat sources without proper ventilation – it can be a real threat to boaters year-round.

Known as the silent killer, carbon monoxide makes victims sick before they even realize something is amiss. It makes victims nauseous, something they could mistake for seasickness. Other symptoms include irritated eyes, headache and dizziness. Many times, folks don’t realize they’re being poisoned until after they have passed out from inhaling the gas. If they’re not found in time, victims can die from carbon monoxide poisoning.

So how exactly does carbon monoxide fit into a breezy day on the water? It can gather along the side or behind a vessel in mere minutes. When exhaust vents are blocked, the gas can accumulate inside the cabin.

Exhaust from other vessels can also contain carbon monoxide. When docked or anchored alongside your boat, your neighbor can emit the poisonous gas your direction. Slow speeds or idling can also cause carbon monoxide to build up to unsafe levels. Even water skiers aren’t immune to the effects of carbon monoxide – if they’re within 20 feet of a moving watercraft, they can be susceptible to carbon monoxide poisoning.

Keep alert to the possibility of carbon monoxide accumulation possibilities. Leave plenty of room between your vessel and other boats, and install carbon monoxide detectors in all cabins. It’s the only way to stay safe!

Maritime Accident Lawyer Richard Serpe – GET HELP

If you’ve been injured, an experienced maritime and Jones Act attorney can help you recover the damages related to your injury. Richard Serpe gained a Masters Degree in maritime law from Tulane University School of Law. He has also been awarded the rank of Proctor (the highest rank available) from the Maritime Law Association of the United States.

FREE MARITIME ACCIDENT CONSULTATION 877-544-5323

istock_000003745723xsmallIt’s National Safe Boating Week – what will you do to celebrate?

Okay, so maybe you’re not planning a real celebration, but there are things you can do to keep yourself safe for this week and the upcoming summer season. Here are some easy ways to get responsible:

1. Wear your life jacket every time you’re on the water. For strong swimmers, this one may seem unnecessary, but the reality is that accidents can happen to anyone. When a person is knocked overboard unexpectedly, they can flail and tire easily. That’s when a life jacket comes in handy. Kids, especially, should always heed this advice. Three fourths of fatal boating accidents were drownings, and 85 percent of those victims were not wearing a life jacket at the time of the accident.

2. Sober drivers are just as necessary at sea as they are on land. A day on the water can make a person thirsty, but make sure you’re reaching for a bottle of water, not beer, while at the helm. You wouldn’t drive a car after drinking, so why is a boat any different?

3. Prep your boat. Your boat needs outfitted for the water, just like you do. But did you know the U.S. Coast Guard offers free Vessel Safety Checks? Treat yourself to some expert opinions this boating safety week!

4. Be smart about weather. Even the most seasoned boater can get caught by a surprise summer thunderstorm. Be smart and check the forecast before heading out.

5. Stay in touch. Never boat without telling a friend where you’re headed, and have multiple ways to keep in touch while out on the water. A cell phone, satellite phone and personal locator beacons can all come in handy in the worst case scenario.

There’s no better way to stay safe than to be proactive. Do your homework before getting on the water this summer, and protect yourself and your loved ones.